Sunday, July 23, 2006

D'Aubigne on Oliver Cromwell

I was critical of D'Aubigne's approach to Cromwell when I first began the biography. I still think my criticisms of MD are justified. That being said, he is a darn good writer! Here are some wonderful snippets from his biography that are worthy of reflection (and imitation!).
Speaking of Cromwell's opposition to Turkish Islamism:

He sailed right into the harbor, adn though the shore was planted with heavy guns, he burnt nine of the Turkish vessels, and brought the tyrant to reason. But he did not confine himself to this mission: he spread the terror of the English name over all of Italy, even to Rome itself (211).

Cromwell himself reflects on his army,

I raised such men as had the fear of God before them, as made some conscience of what they did; and from that day forward, I must say to you, they were never beaten, and wherever they engaged the enemy, they beat continually (240-241).

D'Aubigne concludes:

Without Cromwell, humanly speaking, liberty would have been lost not only to England, but to Europe (278).

Cromwell had his faults, to be sure, and I will go into them in detail in my fuller review.



1 comment:

Ryan S. said...

Maybe I'm hard hard on ole Cromwell. :-)